Witch Hazel

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Witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana)

Description:

Another very attractive yet rare native shrub. It grows to a height of 20 ft. (6 m) and is a slender, graceful shrub. The leaves are 2-6 in. (5-15 cm) long, wavy and toothed, and turn yellow in the fall. In September and October, as the leaves are falling, the bright yellow flowers bloom. The flowers look like those of the forsythia shrubs commonly planted around Island homes, yet appear at the opposite end of the growing season. The seeds are shiny and black, encased within a capsule 1/2 in. (1.2 cm) long. Buds are small, velvety-brown and alternate.

 

Growing Conditions:

The best growth is made under light shade in rich, well-drained soil, but it tolerates a wide range of soil conditions. Witch hazel is a slow growing shrub but is quite hardy.

Propagation:

Collect the capsules as they turn from green to light brown throughout September. Place these in a paper bag or cardboard box in a warm place and allow to dry. The bag should be closed, since as the capsule dry, they split in half and throw out the seeds with a loud “snap”. Plant the seeds every 2 in. (5 cm) in rows 4 in. (10 cm) apart, at a depth of 1/4 in. (6 mm). Seeds generally take two years to germinate and should be lightly mulched and given light shade. Any seedlings that germinate the first year should be carefully transplanted to another bed with some shading. Witch hazel is not as forgiving of rough handling as some other native plants.

Wildlife Uses:

The value to wildlife is relatively low, but red squirrels and ruffed grouse eat the seed and the plant provides cover and protection for other species.

Areas of Usage:

Another excellent landscape plant if you have some shade. Again, it is important in woodland plantings for its beauty and the diversity it provides. Witch hazel is very useful as a medicinal. The twigs and bark are used to produce oil of witch hazel, while the roots are used to produce a tincture that is also known for its healing powers. Also, witch hazel is the shrub of choice for making the divining rods used in water-witching.

Upcoming Events

May
6
Sat
10:00 am Landscaping with Native Plants
Landscaping with Native Plants
May 6 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Landscaping with Native Plants @ Macphail Woods Nature Centre | Vernon Bridge | Prince Edward Island | Canada
The use of native plants to improve wildlife habitat, beautify yards and reduce the size of lawns is attracting a lot of attention these days. A wide variety of native trees, shrubs, wildflowers and ferns
May
13
Sat
8:00 am Birds 8 am and Breakfast 7 am
Birds 8 am and Breakfast 7 am
May 13 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am
Birds 8 am and Breakfast 7 am @ Macphail Woods Nature Centre | Vernon Bridge | Prince Edward Island | Canada
Island woodlands are alive with birds and their songs. While year-round avian residents such as barred owls and juncos are already sitting on their nests, many migrants have just now returned and are singing up
2:00 pm Pruning Trees and Shrubs
Pruning Trees and Shrubs
May 13 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Pruning Trees and Shrubs @ Macphail Woods Nature Centre | Vernon Bridge | Prince Edward Island | Canada
The Pruning Trees and Shrubs workshop begins at 2pm at the Macphail Woods Nature Centre. The pruning workshop will be of interest to all those who work with and enjoy woody plants. Proper pruning maintains