Eastern Larch

Eastern Larch (Tamarack)

Eastern Larch a.k.a. Tamarack (Larix laricina)

Juniper, as the majority of islanders call it, occurs throughout the province. No large or extensive pure stands occur but is chiefly confined to boggy areas gowing with balsam fir and black spruce. In better drained areas, it is found with black, red and white spruce, trembling aspen and white birch. Tamarack seldom reaches a height of over 60 feet on PEI with a diameter of over 18 inches. Tamarack is the heaviest and strongest of our softwoods. It’s resistance to decay makes it very suitable for posts, railway ties, and telephone poles.

 

Historical Information:

Tamarack or larch, was as distinctive for early recorders of island forests as it is today. It’s the only conifer to drop it’s needles every winter. Review of the records indicate that larch was not commonly seen throughtout the island, but rather in scattered areas. One area of concentration was in low wooded areas of western Prince County. Larch was noted to be a medium sized tree, rarely above 18 inches in diameter. Larch was associated with poor wet soils, in areas described as swamps and barrens. Usually associated with black spruce, ash and willow. Larch was a prized tree for it’s durability and resistance to decay. Used for ship building and was described as the best wood for knees and trunnells. Also, used for fence posts and later railway ties. Tamarack also was used to create a powerful turpentine with medicinal qualities.

Upcoming Events

Apr
29
Sat
7:30 pm Owl Prowl 2017 #3
Owl Prowl 2017 #3
Apr 29 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Owl Prowl 2017 #3 @ Macphail Woods Nature Centre | Vernon Bridge | Prince Edward Island | Canada
Come celebrate the wonderful world of owls at one of three Owl Prowls at the Macphail Homestead in Orwell on April 21, 22 and 29. The Sir Andrew Macphail Foundation will open up the Great
May
6
Sat
10:00 am Landscaping with Native Plants
Landscaping with Native Plants
May 6 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Landscaping with Native Plants @ Macphail Woods Nature Centre | Vernon Bridge | Prince Edward Island | Canada
The use of native plants to improve wildlife habitat, beautify yards and reduce the size of lawns is attracting a lot of attention these days. A wide variety of native trees, shrubs, wildflowers and ferns
May
13
Sat
8:00 am Birds 8 am and Breakfast 7 am
Birds 8 am and Breakfast 7 am
May 13 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am
Birds 8 am and Breakfast 7 am @ Macphail Woods Nature Centre | Vernon Bridge | Prince Edward Island | Canada
Island woodlands are alive with birds and their songs. While year-round avian residents such as barred owls and juncos are already sitting on their nests, many migrants have just now returned and are singing up