Black Ash


 Black Ash (Fraxinus nigra)

Description:

Black ash is a slender tree, though not as tall as white ash. It seldom reaches over 50 ft. (16 m) or a diameter of 12 in. (30 cm). It has compound leaves with pointed leaflets that turn yellow in the fall. Unlike white ash, it has no stem connecting the leaflet to the main stem. The bark is grey, with shallow fissures and becoming scaly as the tree ages. Buds are opposite and dark brown to almost black. The seeds are ripe in September and can hang on the tree until late fall. The samara (the actual seed plus the wing that it is attached to) is oblong and has a much broader seed cavity than the white ash.

 

Growing Conditions:

Generally only found along stream banks and the edges of swamps, although it was used for street plantings in some areas. It grows well in open stands of eastern white cedar, red maple and other swamp hardwoods. It does not tolerate shade.

Propagation:

As with white ash, plant seeds every 2 in. (5 cm), in rows 6 in. (15 cm) apart, at a depth of 1/4 in. (6 mm).

Wildlife Uses:

As with the white ash, the seeds are an important food source for red-winged blackbird, evening grosbeak, pine grosbeak, purple finch and other birds. Beavers will often use young ash for food.

Areas of Usage:

In the past, black ash was heavily used by native peoples for basket making and it is still used today for this purpose. It is a good choice for streambank and wetland restoration if the site has full sun.

Additional Information:

Black Ash is confined to the wet areas of PEI. Here is seldom reaches a height of over 50 feet with a diameter of one foot. The trunk is slender and usually extends to the top of the tree. The crown, of slender, mostly upright branches, is narrow and fairly open. It will not grow in the shade of other trees and is mainly confined to wet sites along rivers and brooks, and in the margin of swamps. It grows singly in open stands of eastern white cedar and balsam fir or with red maple and other swamp hardwoods. It is distinguished from the white ash but its stemless leaflets, dark brown to almost black winter buds and it’s light grey bark on the twigs. The wood is not as strong or as hard as that of white ash and is therefore used mainly for decorative purposes, such as interior finish, fixtures and cabinet-work. The wood is values for the Indians who separate it into long strips and weave these into baskets.

Upcoming Events

May
25
Sat
10:00 am Creating and Maintaining Hedgero...
Creating and Maintaining Hedgero...
May 25 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
This workshop will look at on creating diverse, beautiful and functional hedgerows and windbreaks using a variety of native plants. Participants will learn about which plants are best, spacing, planting and maintenance.
Jun
1
Sat
10:00 am Shelter-building for Kids
Shelter-building for Kids
Jun 1 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Take your fort-building skills to the next level! Get outside with the whole family and learn more about shelter do’s and don’ts and how to hang a tarp securely. Let your wild creativity fly by
Jun
8
Sat
10:00 am Plants of Prince Edward Island w...
Plants of Prince Edward Island w...
Jun 8 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Kate, one of the province’s foremost biologists, will focus on many of the plants, both native and non-native, that you commonly encounter, plus a look at lots of rare trees, shrubs, wildflowers and ferns. You
Jun
9
Sun
2:00 pm Debunking Forest-Wildlife Myths ...
Debunking Forest-Wildlife Myths ...
Jun 9 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
We are thrilled that Bob is coming over again from Nova Scotia. The well-known CBC Radio Noon guest and advocate for nature throughout the region will explore some of the myths surrounding forests and wildlife.
Jul
27
Sat
10:00 am Tracking the Mammals of PEI
Tracking the Mammals of PEI
Jul 27 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Come on out and learn about the native and introduced mammals found on PEI, as well as a brief look at some of the mammals we’ve lost. After a brief slideshow, we’ll head off to

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