Bluebead Lily


Bluebead Lily (Clintonia borealis)

Background:

When people talk of wildflowers, they generally mention lovely colours, fragrances, or leaves. The blue-bead lily is a woodland wildflower deserving of kindly words, but not just for its striking appearance. It is important habitat for one of our migratory woodland warblers.

 

Identification:

The broad, fleshly leaves at the base give way to a single stem topped with pale yellow flowers in the spring, when it is often referred to as the corn lily. In the fall, those flowers turn into beautiful, though toxic, bright blue berries. These lilies often grow in dense mats in the forest, creating a wonderful natural landscape.

Wildlife values:

As if that wasn’t enough, they also provide excellent habitat for the ovenbird, a migratory warbler that nests on the ground. The nest has a roof on it and an opening in front, reminiscent of a Dutch oven. Like all ground nesting birds, these warblers are easy prey for a variety of nest-robbers, including cats, foxes, raccoons and blue jays. To counter these threats, the ovenbird often makes its nest in a dense patch of blue-bead lily – the fleshy, overhanging leaves hide and protect the nest.

Conservation:

like trilliums, the blue-bead lily can easily be grown from seed, and the young plants then can be placed in woodlands that have few or no seed sources. They are widely adaptable, preferring mixed woodlands with dappled light, but they can also grow thrive in older conifer stands. In areas with blue-bead lilies, it is important to keep to the trails (or if there are no trails, skirt the patches) to avoid walking on the plants. This helps conserve both the plants themselves and any nesting ovenbirds.

Upcoming Events

Jul
28
Sat
10:00 am Tracking the Mammals of PEI
Tracking the Mammals of PEI
Jul 28 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Come on out and learn about the native and introduced mammals found on PEI, as well as a brief look at some of the mammals we’ve lost. After a brief slideshow, we’ll head off to
Aug
1
Wed
9:00 am How to Share a Love of Nature: A...
How to Share a Love of Nature: A...
Aug 1 @ 9:00 am – Aug 3 @ 3:00 pm
How to Share a Love of Nature: A Course of Island Educators @ Macphail Woods Nature Centre | Vernon Bridge | Prince Edward Island | Canada
How to Share a Love of Nature: A Course for Island Educators August 1st – 3rd $200 Register Nowby ACTIVE Network There is almost nothing as rewarding as watching a child fall in love with
Aug
11
Sat
1:00 pm Arboretum Volunteer Afternoon
Arboretum Volunteer Afternoon
Aug 11 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Come out and help with our work on our Native Plant Arboretum. We’ll have lots of tools and compost and mulch, and a variety of native shrubs, wildflowers and ferns to plant. This is already
Aug
26
Sun
2:00 pm Festival of Forests
Festival of Forests
Aug 26 @ 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Our Third Annual Festival of Forests will be a family-friendly event, with children’s activities, guided walks, food and micro-workshops. This will be a great opportunity to explore the wonders of the Acadian Forest.
Sep
22
Sat
9:00 am Knots and Natural Cordage
Knots and Natural Cordage
Sep 22 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Knots and Natural Cordage @ Macphail Woods Nature Centre | Vernon Bridge | Prince Edward Island | Canada
Knots and Natural Cordage Saturday Sept 22nd $100 Register Nowby ACTIVE Network Does the job require a truckers hitch or just two half hitches? Should I use a sheet bend, zeppelin bend or a square

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